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New Day


photo : sophisticatedyouth.com


New Day

I went to visit world of silent.
Where just me and my soul, were existed.
When the night is falling apart.
Stars started dropping their charges.
I cried out loud and dreams were about to end.
When I heard the ring of my tones at the time.
Voices and lights, they finally waked me up.
A Brightened New Day, just got to its life.
Wishing you have a very beautiful day of bright.

Thank you very much. Happy New Year!!!!
regards,
lynnnayko

Try it out!!!!

1.Copy the below content and Paste it to notepad.
2 Use replace all (Ctrl + H)

3.And click on 'replace all' 6 with _ (Under score), (Try font size as 6)


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source : Fun & Fun only

Have fun!!!!
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Cinema 2009


This awesome video is created by Kees van Dijkhuizen

Merry Christmas to all!!!
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Heat


video by : mimi2699

Robert De Niro and Al Pacino!!!! Two legends, meeting on the streets of L.A. HEAT!!!

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Words - Boyzone

On

video by : KoolAlidden
Smile, an everlasting smile. A smile can bring you near to me.
All credits and Thanks to KoolAlidden

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Insomnia


video by : Buzzati

Day never ends, nightmare becomes real and no one is innocent. This is an unspeakable crime.

This Movie, with nice plot and awesome starring of both Robin Williams and Al Pacino, will fill the dull blanks of your day.
Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!! Have a great holidays!!!!!
ref : imdb.com
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Life



Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Test



We're being tested.
We're doing test.
We're making test.
Testing, always goes on.
Sometimes, survived the test.
Sometimes, failed the test.
Dear Sweety,
This is a test and you must pass.

regards,
lynnnayko

Christmases when you were mine - Taylor Swift

On

video by : xXCrazyForLyricsXx
Try not to be alone.
Avoid drying your heart with, just freezing snow.
Make your feelings, ringing to hearts of your love ones, in time.

Wishing all of you, will get very happy beautiful holiday season, with your love ones.
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

24 Season 8 Official Trailer

A new day begins in January.

A new day will be starting on January 17 2010. Enjoy the show!!

Official Website : http://www.fox.com/24

Have a Great Holidays!!!!! :)

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Smiles


photo by : c2win
(photo © c2win)

ၾကယ္ေၾကြတာကို ပထမဆံုးျမင္ဖူးတဲ့ညက
နီယြန္ခင္းတဲ့ ညကို ငါတေယာက္ထဲ ျဖတ္ေလွ်ာက္ခဲ့တယ္
ၾကယ္ေတြ ျမဴးတာလဲ ျမင္ခဲ့ရေသးတယ္
........................
.............................
ဒီလို .... ဒီလို..............
ဒီဇင္ဘာညေတြေပါ့....
ႏွဳတ္ခမ္းေတြေျခာက္ျပီး.....
အနမ္းေတြ ေပ်ာက္ခဲ့တာလဲ...
ၾကာျပီ....

The first time, I saw the star's falling.
There're only loneliness and me, on the neon flooring night.
That night is staring at the dancing stars.

So, and so on.....
December nights, were being dry and cold.
There're only chilling and drying lips are attaching on the face, while kisses are getting away.

The night, missing you much.
The night, crying you to come back.
The night, thinking of you, until the dawn's beams, crossing through my flat.

Smiles on your face, are only things, I ever saw, in the dreams of my nights.

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Celtic Woman-The Christmas Song

On

video by : Palmie01
Actually, I've got this video link from my friend on facebook. :)
Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Buccaneer Anti Piracy Protection System




On a blustery Dorset afternoon, the green-grey waters of Portland harbour stood in for the sea off Somalia and an electronic engineer called Murray played the part of a ransom-hungry raider.

Then with a roar and a whoosh, a device aimed at protecting merchant ships from the growing hazard of piracy called the Buccaneer Ship-Borne Shore Launcher was unveiled.

The idea is that if a pirate skiff approaches, a length of strong rope can be fired into the path of the vessel from the Buccaneer. A small parachute makes sure the 300m long rope flutters down on to the surface of the water and the pirates, unaware that they have been fired on, speed over it and find their propellers hopelessly tangled.

It is a sort of marine version of the spike strip – tyre-puncturing devices police forces use to stop cars – prompting some to dub the Buccaneer the "Somalian stinger". It is already attracting interest from shipping companies around the world.

A major problem captains of merchant ships have when faced with pirates is that they are constrained by international laws about what force they can use. In any case, there is obviously a huge risk in opening fire on pirates because they are more than likely to fire back.
Read More @ http://guardian.co.uk

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Hnit Pat Lal - Bunny Phyo


video by : meengelay1
This song's really telling me my story. but... i'm not supposed to recover it now. So better let it flow like "once upon the time in singapore....." :) enjoy the music!! I'll try to upload translated version later. Thank you very much.

regards,
lynnnayko

Umberto Tozzi - Te amo

On


video by : LaPrincesaSinReino

Umberto Tozzi - Te amo

Ti amo, in sogno
Ti amo, in aria
Ti amo se viene testa
vuol dire che basta:
lasciamoci.
Ti amo, io sono
(tiam) in fondo un uomo
che non ha freddo nel cuore,
nel letto comando io.

Ma tremo
davanti al tuo seno,
ti odio e ti amo,
e' una farfalla che muore
sbattendo le ali.
L'amore che a letto si fa
prendimi l'altra meta'
oggi ritorno da lei
primo maggio,su coraggio
Io ti amo
e chiedo perdono
ricordi chi sono
apri la porta
a un guerriero di carta igienica.
Dammi il tuo vino leggero
che hai fatto quando non c'ero
e le lenzuola di lino
dammi il sonno di un bambino
Che "ta" sogna cavalli e si gira
e un po' di lavoro
fammi abbracciare una donna
che stira cantando.
E poi fatti un po' prendere in giro
prima di fare l'amore
vesti la rabbia di pace
e sottane sulla luce.

Io ti amo e chiedo perdono
ricordi chi sono
ti amo, ti amo,ti amo
ti amo ti amo
dammi il tuo vino leggero...
che hai fatto quando non c'ero
e le lenzuola di lino
dammi il sonno di un bambino
Che "ta" sogna cavalli e si gira
e un po' di lavoro
fammi abbracciare una donna
che stira cantando.
E poi fatti un po' prendere
in giro
prima di fare l'amore
vesti la rabbia di pace
e sottane sulla luce.
io ti amo,
ti amo, ti amo
ti amo, ti amo

 Umberto Tozzi - Te amo

god how i love u so
my heart just wont let go
day after day im still holding on
even though ur gone
ti amo, ?
did all that i coud do
to make you want to be here with me
i thought u loved me

i cant beleive you could just turn and leave
u did it so easily, u pulled my world out from under me
look what youve done to me

tiamo god how i love u so
how could u end it this way
after the love that we made
god how i wish u could stay
cant u see that i just want ur love
my heart just wont let go
day after day im still holding on
even though ur gone

i cant beleive you could just turn and leave
u did it so easily, u pulled my world out from under me
look what youve done to me

how could u end it this way
after the love that we made
god how i wish u could stay
cant u see that i just want ur love

repeat 1x

italian translations of song 

Thank you very much for your visit. It means a lot to me.
regards,
lynnnayko

The Art of Marriage

Happiness in marriage is not something that just happens.
A good marriage must be created.
In the art of marriage the little things are the big things...

It is never being too old to hold hands.

It is remembering to say "I love you" at least once a day.

It is never going to sleep angry.

It is at no time taking the other for granted;
the courtship should not end with the honeymoon,
it should continue through all the years.

It is having a mutual sense of values and common objectives.
It is standing together facing the world.

It is forming a circle of love that gathers in the whole family.

It is doing things for each other, not in the attitude
of duty or sacrifice, but in the spirit of joy.

It is speaking words of appreciation
and demonstrating gratitude in thoughtful ways.

It is not looking for perfection in each other.
It is cultivating flexibility, patience,
understanding and a sense of humour.

It is having the capacity to forgive and forget.

It is giving each other an atmosphere in which each can grow.

It is finding room for the things of the spirit.
It is a common search for the good and the beautiful.

It is establishing a relationship in which the independence is equal,
dependence is mutual and the obligation is reciprocal.

It is not only marrying the right partner, it is being the right partner.

It is discovering what marriage can be, at its best.
 
written by Wilferd Arlan Peterson

source : wikipedia.org
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Sherlock Holmes Trailer



Sherlock Holmes, will be in theaters around the world on Christmas Day.
Click here to see its IMDB.
Thank you very much for your visit.
regards,
lynnnayko

Islamists flee Philippines prison after militants' raid

On
A group of suspected Islamic militants have attacked a jail in the southern Philippines, freeing at least 31 prisoners, prison officials say.
Two people, including a prison guard, are believed to have been killed during a gunfight as the prisoners escaped.
Basilan island's Vice Governor Al Rasheed Sakalahul told the Associated Press the gunmen had wanted to free Muslim guerrillas held in the jail.
He said other inmates had also escaped during the attack early on Sunday.
Mr Sakalahul said about 30 gunmen had used sledgehammers to break through the jail's concrete perimeter wall before using bolt-cutters to cut through padlocks on cell doors.
One of the prison guards was killed and another injured during the ensuing clash, provincial police chief Abubakar Tulawie told Reuters news agency.
'High-risk prisoners'
Regional military commander Maj Gen Benjamin Dolorfino told AP the 31 who escaped included suspected members of a Muslim rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (Milf), and suspected militants from the Abu Sayyaf group.
source and read more at http://bbc.co.uk
regards,
lynnnayko

North Korean weapons shipment aircraft was seized in Bangkok

On
Pilots from North Korean plane, carrying deadly arms, were arrested after making emergency landing to refuel, at Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok. Officials found about 35 tonnes of weapons from the Kazakhstan registerd llyushin 76 transport, on its way to Sri Lanka from
N. Korea. But the destination of the weapons was not known.
ref:bangkokpost
Thank you very much for visiting. It means a lot to me.
regards,
lynnnayko

The Exit & the product of nature


the_Exit

 
the_product_of_nature by MHL

Thank you very much for visiting. It means a lot to me.
regards,
lynnnayko

Goodbye my lover.

On

This song is really touching me. Actually I used to listen this song 2 or 3 years back. I couldn't feel it at that time but now.





Thank you very much for your visiting. It means a lot to me.
regards,
lynnnayko

GMail Password Phishing

On
Beware of GMail Password Phishing Messages.
Message 1 :
"Google Mail is built on the idea that email can be intuitive, efficient, and useful. And maybe even fun.
Labels instead of folders
Labels do the work of folders with an extra bonus: a conversation can have several labels, so you're not forced to choose one particular folder. Learn more
Archive instead of delete
You shouldn't ever have to throw things away. Archiving moves messages out of your inbox and into "All Mail," so they don't clutter your inbox but remain searchable in case you ever need them again. Learn more
Due to anonymous registration of accounts so we are shutting down some email accounts and your account was automatically chosen to be deleted. If you are still interested in using our email service please fill in the space below for verification purpose by clicking the reply button.
User name:
Password:
Date Of Birth:
Country:
Conversation view
Google Mail groups emails and their replies in your inbox, so you always see your messages in the context of your conversation. Related messages are stacked neatly on top of each other, like a deck of cards. Learn more
Chat and video chat
You don't have to use another program -- chat is built right into Google Mail. Learn more
You can even talk face to face with voice and video chat. All you need is a webcam and a small download that takes seconds to install.
Learn more about getting started with Google Mail.
Welcome!
- The Google Mail Team"

Message 2:
"Due to the congestion in all Gmail users and removal of all unused Gmail Accounts. Gmail would be shutting down all unused Accounts, you will have to confirm your E-mail by filling out your Login Information below after clicking the reply button or your account will be suspended within 24 hours for security reasons.

* User name: .............................
* Password: ................................
* Date of Birth: ............................
* Country Or Territory: ....................


Note: This email is only for Gmail users.


Thank you for using Google !
The Google Team"

I don't think gmail will ever ask its user like this. So, please ignore and delete those messages if you receive it.

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

President Obama's Nobel Peace Prize Awarding Ceremony Speech

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary

Oslo City Hall
Oslo, Norway
1:44 P.M. CET
THE PRESIDENT:  Your Majesties, Your Royal Highnesses, distinguished members of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, citizens of America, and citizens of the world:

I receive this honor with deep gratitude and great humility.  It is an award that speaks to our highest aspirations -- that for all the cruelty and hardship of our world, we are not mere prisoners of fate.  Our actions matter, and can bend history in the direction of justice.

And yet I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the considerable controversy that your generous decision has generated.  (Laughter.)  In part, this is because I am at the beginning, and not the end, of my labors on the world stage.  Compared to some of the giants of history who've received this prize -- Schweitzer and King; Marshall and Mandela -- my accomplishments are slight.  And then there are the men and women around the world who have been jailed and beaten in the pursuit of justice; those who toil in humanitarian organizations to relieve suffering; the unrecognized millions whose quiet acts of courage and compassion inspire even the most hardened cynics.  I cannot argue with those who find these men and women -- some known, some obscure to all but those they help -- to be far more deserving of this honor than I.

But perhaps the most profound issue surrounding my receipt of this prize is the fact that I am the Commander-in-Chief of the military of a nation in the midst of two wars.  One of these wars is winding down.  The other is a conflict that America did not seek; one in which we are joined by 42 other countries -- including Norway -- in an effort to defend ourselves and all nations from further attacks.

Still, we are at war, and I'm responsible for the deployment of thousands of young Americans to battle in a distant land.  Some will kill, and some will be killed.  And so I come here with an acute sense of the costs of armed conflict -- filled with difficult questions about the relationship between war and peace, and our effort to replace one with the other.

Now these questions are not new.  War, in one form or another, appeared with the first man.  At the dawn of history, its morality was not questioned; it was simply a fact, like drought or disease -- the manner in which tribes and then civilizations sought power and settled their differences.

And over time, as codes of law sought to control violence within groups, so did philosophers and clerics and statesmen seek to regulate the destructive power of war.  The concept of a "just war" emerged, suggesting that war is justified only when certain conditions were met:  if it is waged as a last resort or in self-defense; if the force used is proportional; and if, whenever possible, civilians are spared from violence.

Of course, we know that for most of history, this concept of "just war" was rarely observed.  The capacity of human beings to think up new ways to kill one another proved inexhaustible, as did our capacity to exempt from mercy those who look different or pray to a different God.  Wars between armies gave way to wars between nations -- total wars in which the distinction between combatant and civilian became blurred.  In the span of 30 years, such carnage would twice engulf this continent.  And while it's hard to conceive of a cause more just than the defeat of the Third Reich and the Axis powers, World War II was a conflict in which the total number of civilians who died exceeded the number of soldiers who perished.

In the wake of such destruction, and with the advent of the nuclear age, it became clear to victor and vanquished alike that the world needed institutions to prevent another world war.  And so, a quarter century after the United States Senate rejected the League of Nations -- an idea for which Woodrow Wilson received this prize -- America led the world in constructing an architecture to keep the peace:  a Marshall Plan and a United Nations, mechanisms to govern the waging of war, treaties to protect human rights, prevent genocide, restrict the most dangerous weapons.

In many ways, these efforts succeeded.  Yes, terrible wars have been fought, and atrocities committed.  But there has been no Third World War.  The Cold War ended with jubilant crowds dismantling a wall.  Commerce has stitched much of the world together.  Billions have been lifted from poverty.  The ideals of liberty and self-determination, equality and the rule of law have haltingly advanced.  We are the heirs of the fortitude and foresight of generations past, and it is a legacy for which my own country is rightfully proud.

And yet, a decade into a new century, this old architecture is buckling under the weight of new threats.  The world may no longer shudder at the prospect of war between two nuclear superpowers, but proliferation may increase the risk of catastrophe.  Terrorism has long been a tactic, but modern technology allows a few small men with outsized rage to murder innocents on a horrific scale.

Moreover, wars between nations have increasingly given way to wars within nations.  The resurgence of ethnic or sectarian conflicts; the growth of secessionist movements, insurgencies, and failed states -- all these things have increasingly trapped civilians in unending chaos.  In today's wars, many more civilians are killed than soldiers; the seeds of future conflict are sown, economies are wrecked, civil societies torn asunder, refugees amassed, children scarred.

I do not bring with me today a definitive solution to the problems of war.  What I do know is that meeting these challenges will require the same vision, hard work, and persistence of those men and women who acted so boldly decades ago.  And it will require us to think in new ways about the notions of just war and the imperatives of a just peace.

We must begin by acknowledging the hard truth:  We will not eradicate violent conflict in our lifetimes.  There will be times when nations -- acting individually or in concert -- will find the use of force not only necessary but morally justified.

I make this statement mindful of what Martin Luther King Jr. said in this same ceremony years ago:  "Violence never brings permanent peace.  It solves no social problem:  it merely creates new and more complicated ones."  As someone who stands here as a direct consequence of Dr. King's life work, I am living testimony to the moral force of non-violence.  I know there's nothing weak -- nothing passive -- nothing naïve -- in the creed and lives of Gandhi and King.

But as a head of state sworn to protect and defend my nation, I cannot be guided by their examples alone.  I face the world as it is, and cannot stand idle in the face of threats to the American people.  For make no mistake:  Evil does exist in the world.  A non-violent movement could not have halted Hitler's armies.  Negotiations cannot convince al Qaeda's leaders to lay down their arms.  To say that force may sometimes be necessary is not a call to cynicism -- it is a recognition of history; the imperfections of man and the limits of reason.

I raise this point, I begin with this point because in many countries there is a deep ambivalence about military action today, no matter what the cause.  And at times, this is joined by a reflexive suspicion of America, the world's sole military superpower.

But the world must remember that it was not simply international institutions -- not just treaties and declarations -- that brought stability to a post-World War II world.  Whatever mistakes we have made, the plain fact is this:  The United States of America has helped underwrite global security for more than six decades with the blood of our citizens and the strength of our arms.  The service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform has promoted peace and prosperity from Germany to Korea, and enabled democracy to take hold in places like the Balkans.  We have borne this burden not because we seek to impose our will.  We have done so out of enlightened self-interest -- because we seek a better future for our children and grandchildren, and we believe that their lives will be better if others' children and grandchildren can live in freedom and prosperity.

So yes, the instruments of war do have a role to play in preserving the peace.  And yet this truth must coexist with another -- that no matter how justified, war promises human tragedy.  The soldier's courage and sacrifice is full of glory, expressing devotion to country, to cause, to comrades in arms.  But war itself is never glorious, and we must never trumpet it as such.

So part of our challenge is reconciling these two seemingly inreconcilable truths -- that war is sometimes necessary, and war at some level is an expression of human folly.  Concretely, we must direct our effort to the task that President Kennedy called for long ago.  "Let us focus," he said, "on a more practical, more attainable peace, based not on a sudden revolution in human nature but on a gradual evolution in human institutions."  A gradual evolution of human institutions.

What might this evolution look like?  What might these practical steps be?

To begin with, I believe that all nations -- strong and weak alike -- must adhere to standards that govern the use of force.  I -- like any head of state -- reserve the right to act unilaterally if necessary to defend my nation.  Nevertheless, I am convinced that adhering to standards, international standards, strengthens those who do, and isolates and weakens those who don't.
The world rallied around America after the 9/11 attacks, and continues to support our efforts in Afghanistan, because of the horror of those senseless attacks and the recognized principle of self-defense.  Likewise, the world recognized the need to confront Saddam Hussein when he invaded Kuwait -- a consensus that sent a clear message to all about the cost of aggression.

Furthermore, America -- in fact, no nation -- can insist that others follow the rules of the road if we refuse to follow them ourselves.  For when we don't, our actions appear arbitrary and undercut the legitimacy of future interventions, no matter how justified.

And this becomes particularly important when the purpose of military action extends beyond self-defense or the defense of one nation against an aggressor.  More and more, we all confront difficult questions about how to prevent the slaughter of civilians by their own government, or to stop a civil war whose violence and suffering can engulf an entire region.

I believe that force can be justified on humanitarian grounds, as it was in the Balkans, or in other places that have been scarred by war.  Inaction tears at our conscience and can lead to more costly intervention later.  That's why all responsible nations must embrace the role that militaries with a clear mandate can play to keep the peace.

America's commitment to global security will never waver.  But in a world in which threats are more diffuse, and missions more complex, America cannot act alone.  America alone cannot secure the peace.  This is true in Afghanistan.  This is true in failed states like Somalia, where terrorism and piracy is joined by famine and human suffering.  And sadly, it will continue to be true in unstable regions for years to come.

The leaders and soldiers of NATO countries, and other friends and allies, demonstrate this truth through the capacity and courage they've shown in Afghanistan.  But in many countries, there is a disconnect between the efforts of those who serve and the ambivalence of the broader public.  I understand why war is not popular, but I also know this:  The belief that peace is desirable is rarely enough to achieve it.  Peace requires responsibility.  Peace entails sacrifice.  That's why NATO continues to be indispensable.  That's why we must strengthen U.N. and regional peacekeeping, and not leave the task to a few countries.  That's why we honor those who return home from peacekeeping and training abroad to Oslo and Rome; to Ottawa and Sydney; to Dhaka and Kigali -- we honor them not as makers of war, but of wagers -- but as wagers of peace.

Let me make one final point about the use of force.  Even as we make difficult decisions about going to war, we must also think clearly about how we fight it.  The Nobel Committee recognized this truth in awarding its first prize for peace to Henry Dunant -- the founder of the Red Cross, and a driving force behind the Geneva Conventions.

Where force is necessary, we have a moral and strategic interest in binding ourselves to certain rules of conduct.  And even as we confront a vicious adversary that abides by no rules, I believe the United States of America must remain a standard bearer in the conduct of war.  That is what makes us different from those whom we fight.  That is a source of our strength.  That is why I prohibited torture.  That is why I ordered the prison at Guantanamo Bay closed.  And that is why I have reaffirmed America's commitment to abide by the Geneva Conventions.  We lose ourselves when we compromise the very ideals that we fight to defend.  (Applause.)  And we honor -- we honor those ideals by upholding them not when it's easy, but when it is hard.

I have spoken at some length to the question that must weigh on our minds and our hearts as we choose to wage war.  But let me now turn to our effort to avoid such tragic choices, and speak of three ways that we can build a just and lasting peace.

First, in dealing with those nations that break rules and laws, I believe that we must develop alternatives to violence that are tough enough to actually change behavior -- for if we want a lasting peace, then the words of the international community must mean something.  Those regimes that break the rules must be held accountable.  Sanctions must exact a real price.  Intransigence must be met with increased pressure -- and such pressure exists only when the world stands together as one.

One urgent example is the effort to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, and to seek a world without them.  In the middle of the last century, nations agreed to be bound by a treaty whose bargain is clear:  All will have access to peaceful nuclear power; those without nuclear weapons will forsake them; and those with nuclear weapons will work towards disarmament.  I am committed to upholding this treaty.  It is a centerpiece of my foreign policy.  And I'm working with President Medvedev to reduce America and Russia's nuclear stockpiles.

But it is also incumbent upon all of us to insist that nations like Iran and North Korea do not game the system.  Those who claim to respect international law cannot avert their eyes when those laws are flouted.  Those who care for their own security cannot ignore the danger of an arms race in the Middle East or East Asia.  Those who seek peace cannot stand idly by as nations arm themselves for nuclear war.
The same principle applies to those who violate international laws by brutalizing their own people.  When there is genocide in Darfur, systematic rape in Congo, repression in Burma -- there must be consequences.  Yes, there will be engagement; yes, there will be diplomacy -- but there must be consequences when those things fail.  And the closer we stand together, the less likely we will be faced with the choice between armed intervention and complicity in oppression.

This brings me to a second point -- the nature of the peace that we seek.  For peace is not merely the absence of visible conflict.  Only a just peace based on the inherent rights and dignity of every individual can truly be lasting.

It was this insight that drove drafters of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights after the Second World War.  In the wake of devastation, they recognized that if human rights are not protected, peace is a hollow promise.

And yet too often, these words are ignored.  For some countries, the failure to uphold human rights is excused by the false suggestion that these are somehow Western principles, foreign to local cultures or stages of a nation's development.  And within America, there has long been a tension between those who describe themselves as realists or idealists -- a tension that suggests a stark choice between the narrow pursuit of interests or an endless campaign to impose our values around the world.

I reject these choices.  I believe that peace is unstable where citizens are denied the right to speak freely or worship as they please; choose their own leaders or assemble without fear.  Pent-up grievances fester, and the suppression of tribal and religious identity can lead to violence.  We also know that the opposite is true.  Only when Europe became free did it finally find peace.  America has never fought a war against a democracy, and our closest friends are governments that protect the rights of their citizens.  No matter how callously defined, neither America's interests -- nor the world's -- are served by the denial of human aspirations.

So even as we respect the unique culture and traditions of different countries, America will always be a voice for those aspirations that are universal.  We will bear witness to the quiet dignity of reformers like Aung Sang Suu Kyi; to the bravery of Zimbabweans who cast their ballots in the face of beatings; to the hundreds of thousands who have marched silently through the streets of Iran.  It is telling that the leaders of these governments fear the aspirations of their own people more than the power of any other nation.  And it is the responsibility of all free people and free nations to make clear that these movements -- these movements of hope and history -- they have us on their side.

Let me also say this:  The promotion of human rights cannot be about exhortation alone.  At times, it must be coupled with painstaking diplomacy.  I know that engagement with repressive regimes lacks the satisfying purity of indignation.  But I also know that sanctions without outreach -- condemnation without discussion -- can carry forward only a crippling status quo.  No repressive regime can move down a new path unless it has the choice of an open door.

In light of the Cultural Revolution's horrors, Nixon's meeting with Mao appeared inexcusable -- and yet it surely helped set China on a path where millions of its citizens have been lifted from poverty and connected to open societies.  Pope John Paul's engagement with Poland created space not just for the Catholic Church, but for labor leaders like Lech Walesa.  Ronald Reagan's efforts on arms control and embrace of perestroika not only improved relations with the Soviet Union, but empowered dissidents throughout Eastern Europe.  There's no simple formula here.  But we must try as best we can to balance isolation and engagement, pressure and incentives, so that human rights and dignity are advanced over time.

Third, a just peace includes not only civil and political rights -- it must encompass economic security and opportunity.  For true peace is not just freedom from fear, but freedom from want.

It is undoubtedly true that development rarely takes root without security; it is also true that security does not exist where human beings do not have access to enough food, or clean water, or the medicine and shelter they need to survive.  It does not exist where children can't aspire to a decent education or a job that supports a family.  The absence of hope can rot a society from within.

And that's why helping farmers feed their own people -- or nations educate their children and care for the sick -- is not mere charity.  It's also why the world must come together to confront climate change.  There is little scientific dispute that if we do nothing, we will face more drought, more famine, more mass displacement -- all of which will fuel more conflict for decades.  For this reason, it is not merely scientists and environmental activists who call for swift and forceful action -- it's military leaders in my own country and others who understand our common security hangs in the balance.

Agreements among nations.  Strong institutions.  Support for human rights.  Investments in development.  All these are vital ingredients in bringing about the evolution that President Kennedy spoke about.  And yet, I do not believe that we will have the will, the determination, the staying power, to complete this work without something more -- and that's the continued expansion of our moral imagination; an insistence that there's something irreducible that we all share.

As the world grows smaller, you might think it would be easier for human beings to recognize how similar we are; to understand that we're all basically seeking the same things; that we all hope for the chance to live out our lives with some measure of happiness and fulfillment for ourselves and our families.

And yet somehow, given the dizzying pace of globalization, the cultural leveling of modernity, it perhaps comes as no surprise that people fear the loss of what they cherish in their particular identities -- their race, their tribe, and perhaps most powerfully their religion.  In some places, this fear has led to conflict.  At times, it even feels like we're moving backwards.  We see it in the Middle East, as the conflict between Arabs and Jews seems to harden.  We see it in nations that are torn asunder by tribal lines.

And most dangerously, we see it in the way that religion is used to justify the murder of innocents by those who have distorted and defiled the great religion of Islam, and who attacked my country from Afghanistan.  These extremists are not the first to kill in the name of God; the cruelties of the Crusades are amply recorded.  But they remind us that no Holy War can ever be a just war.  For if you truly believe that you are carrying out divine will, then there is no need for restraint -- no need to spare the pregnant mother, or the medic, or the Red Cross worker, or even a person of one's own faith.  Such a warped view of religion is not just incompatible with the concept of peace, but I believe it's incompatible with the very purpose of faith -- for the one rule that lies at the heart of every major religion is that we do unto others as we would have them do unto us.
Adhering to this law of love has always been the core struggle of human nature.  For we are fallible.  We make mistakes, and fall victim to the temptations of pride, and power, and sometimes evil.  Even those of us with the best of intentions will at times fail to right the wrongs before us.
But we do not have to think that human nature is perfect for us to still believe that the human condition can be perfected.  We do not have to live in an idealized world to still reach for those ideals that will make it a better place.  The non-violence practiced by men like Gandhi and King may not have been practical or possible in every circumstance, but the love that they preached -- their fundamental faith in human progress -- that must always be the North Star that guides us on our journey.

For if we lose that faith -- if we dismiss it as silly or naïve; if we divorce it from the decisions that we make on issues of war and peace -- then we lose what's best about humanity.  We lose our sense of possibility.  We lose our moral compass.

Like generations have before us, we must reject that future.  As Dr. King said at this occasion so many years ago, "I refuse to accept despair as the final response to the ambiguities of history.  I refuse to accept the idea that the 'isness' of man's present condition makes him morally incapable of reaching up for the eternal 'oughtness' that forever confronts him."

Let us reach for the world that ought to be -- that spark of the divine that still stirs within each of our souls.  (Applause.)
Somewhere today, in the here and now, in the world as it is, a soldier sees he's outgunned, but stands firm to keep the peace.  Somewhere today, in this world, a young protestor awaits the brutality of her government, but has the courage to march on.  Somewhere today, a mother facing punishing poverty still takes the time to teach her child, scrapes together what few coins she has to send that child to school -- because she believes that a cruel world still has a place for that child's dreams.
Let us live by their example.  We can acknowledge that oppression will always be with us, and still strive for justice.  We can admit the intractability of depravation, and still strive for dignity.  Clear-eyed, we can understand that there will be war, and still strive for peace.  We can do that -- for that is the story of human progress; that's the hope of all the world; and at this moment of challenge, that must be our work here on Earth.
Thank you very much.  (Applause.)
END
2:20 P.M. CET
source : whitehouse.gov
regards,
lynnnayko

Nobel Prize




The award was established by the will of Alfred Nobel, Swedish chemist and inventor. The prize awarding ceremony is annually being held on December 10 of  every year to the anniversary of Alfred Nobel's death.
It is being awarded for outstanding contributions in Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Physiology or Medicine and Peace since 1901.

Nobel Laureates 2009

Physics
Charles K. Kao
" for groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication"
Standard Telecommunication Laboratories
Harlow, United Kingdom; Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong, China
born in Shanghai, China 1933.

Willard S. Boyle
"for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor"
Bell Laboratories
Murray Hill, NJ, USA
born in Amherst, NS, Canada 1924.

George E. Smith
"for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor"
Bell Laboratories
Murray Hill, NJ, USA
born in 1930.

Chemistry
Venkatraman Ramakrishnan
"for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome"
United Kingdom     
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Cambridge, United Kingdom
born in Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India 1952.

Thomas A. Steitz
"for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome"
Yale University
New Haven, CT, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute
United States of America
born in 1940.

Ada E. Yonath
Weizmann Institute of Science
Rehovot, Israel
Israel
born in 1939.

Physiology or Medicine
"for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase"
Elizabeth H. Blackburn
University of California
San Francisco, CA, USA
United States of America
born in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia 1948.

Carol W. Greider
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD, USA
United States of America
born in 1961.

Jack W. Szostak
Harvard Medical School; Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute
United States of America
born in London, United Kingdom 1952.

Literature
Herta Müller
"who, with the concentration of poetry and the frankness of prose, depicts the landscape of the dispossessed"
Germany.
born in Nitzkydorf, Banat, Romania 1953.

Peace
Barack H. Obama
"for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples"
44th President of the United States of America.
born in 1961

Economics (Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences)
Elinor Ostrom
"for her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons"
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN, USA.
United States of America
born in 1933.

Oliver E. Williamson
"for his analysis of economic governance, especially the boundaries of the firm"
University of California
Berkeley, CA, USA
United States of America
born in 1932.

Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (officially The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel), reffered to as the Nobel Prize in Economics, was  established and endowed by Sveriges Riksbank, Sweden's central bank, in memory of Alfred Nobel.

List of Nobel Peace Prize Laureates since 1901

reference:
http://wikipedia.org
http://nobelprize.org

Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Rutan and Branson make a giant leap for space tourism


 photo : latimes.com
On a wind-tossed desert night, the dream of space pioneers Richard Branson and Burt Rutan to bring space flight to everyone -- at least everyone who can afford it -- drew closer to reality when the pair unveiled the world's first commercial passenger spacecraft.

To the strings of an ethereal soundtrack, as dreamlike purple lights played across the runway, the VSS Enterprise rolled into view at the Mojave Air and Space Port, about 95 miles north of downtown Los Angeles.
Despite the bracing wind-chill factor, hundreds of people who had flown in from around the world to view the craft burst into cheers and applause.

read more :http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-sci-virgin8-2009dec08,0,5479695.story
source : latimes.com
regards,
lynnnayko

President Obama will fly to Oslo, Norway to accept Nobel Peace Prize

On

photo by : (UPI Photo/Dennis Brack/Pool) and upi.com

President Obama will arrive in Norway on Thursday to accept the Nobel Peace Prize. The president will stay 26 hours in capital Oslo meeting the royal family, attending awarding ceremony and award banquet.
The live cast of the ceremony will be streaming on CNN.com starting from 7 AM ET.

ref : cnn.com
regards,
lynnnayko

Thai Airways International sues PAD (yellow shirted)

On

THAI (THai Airways International) filed THB 575 Million lawsuits against PAD (yellow shirt) leaders who led anti-Thaksin protesters in the seizures of Bangkok's two airports last year. PAD led yellow shirted protesters seized Suvarnabhumi and Don Muang International Airport and caused cancellation for many flights and stranded thousands of passengers.

ref:The Nation

regards,
lynnnayko

International Street Show in Bangkok



As we are greeting to Christmas and New Year, from December 10 to 13, "The International Street Show in Bangkok" will proudly be presented at Lumpini Park, Bangkok.There will be different kinds of street performances that will be performed by the group or individual performers from the overseas and domestic.
This festival is proudly brought to you by Workpoint Entertainment Public Company Limited and Sixnature Incorporation Company Limited.

Visit and enjoy the festival, while feeling the dynamic rhythms of the city of Bangkok at this holiday season.

source and more detail : http://www.bangkokstreetshow.com/en/index.html
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

British Burma

photo source : wikipedia.com

This is a flag of British Burma which was used from 1937 to 1948. I'm just sharing what I found out with no political intention.
Myanmar, formerly named Burma, was under British colony from 1886 to 1948. But Burma (Myanmar) was under British control since 1824 as British began its invasion in 1824, start from coastal territories such as Irrawaddy Delta and Rangoon.

ref : wikipedia.com
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Gomenasai - TATU

On

video by : water20102003

Gomenasai

What I thought wasn't mine
In the light
Was a one of a kind,
A precious pearl

When I wanted to cry
I couldn't cause I
Wasn't allowed

Gomenasai for everything
Gomenasai, I know I let you down
Gomenasai till the end
I never needed a friend
Like I do now

What I thought wasn't all
So innocent
Was a delicate doll
Of porcelain

When I wanted to call you
And ask you for help
I stopped myself

Gomenasai for everything
Gomenasai, I know I let you down
Gomenasai till the end
I never needed a friend
Like I do now

What I thought was a dream
A mirage
Was as real as it seemed
A privilege

When I wanted to tell you
I made a mistake
I walked away

Gomenasai, for everything
Gomenasai, Gomenasai, Gomenasai
I never needed a friend,
Like I do now

Gomenasai, I let you down
Gomenasai, Gomenasai,
Gomenasai till the end
I never needed a friend
Like I do now
lyrics : sing365.com

regards,
lynnnayko

Men need to check for breast cancer, too

On
This article appeared on page A - 1 of the San Francisco Chronicle

When Rob Fechtner of Napa woke up one morning in 2006 to a sore spot on his chest and a strange indentation in his nipple, his first thought was that he'd pulled a muscle. Even his doctor told him it was probably nothing to worry about.

But the inverted nipple bothered him, and with a little online research he learned it was a symptom of breast cancer - in men as well as women. He pushed his doctor for a mammogram, and two days later he learned that he did, in fact, have breast cancer. He's since had a mastectomy and been treated with chemotherapy.

"Before I went on the Internet, I had no idea men could get breast cancer," said Fechtner, 51. "I should have known in the back of my mind that it was a possibility. We need to get the message out there to men."

Male breast cancer is rare - less than 1 percent of all breast cancer cases in the United States are in men, according to the American Cancer Society. But some men may be at greater risk than others of getting cancer - those who carry the breast cancer gene, for example, or who have been exposed to radiation in the chest. And because men aren't routinely screened for breast cancer, and aren't often encouraged to perform self-exams, their cancers are usually more advanced by the time they're diagnosed.

So while breast cancer is much more unusual in men than in women, it's also deadlier.

"Men present sometimes a little bit later, because they don't expect breast cancer," said Dr. Susan Kutner, chairwoman of Kaiser Permanente's Regional Breast Care Task Force. "They get a lump and they think it's from something they did. It's not part of their consciousness that it's something they're at risk for."
Signs may be missed

There are fewer than 2,000 new cases and 450 deaths from breast cancer in men each year, compared to more than 192,000 new cases and 40,000 deaths in women, says the American Cancer Society.

Symptoms of breast cancer in men and women can include dimpling or puckering of the skin on the breast; an inverted nipple, or other changes such as redness or scaling on the nipple; and nipple discharge.

Women are more likely to notice symptoms, if only because they're usually more body-conscious than men, Kutner said. They see their doctors for regular gynecological visits, when they usually have breast exams, too, and they experience normal hormonal changes that may make them more sensitive to irregularities in their bodies.

Even if they don't perform regular self- exams, women tend to notice subtle changes in their breasts that men might ignore, Kutner said.

"It's not a bad idea for men to get used to their bodies, too," Kutner said. "We know that understanding when your body changes is often the first sign of something."

Diagnosing breast cancer in men can be easier than in women because male breast tissue isn't nearly as dense and the cancerous tissue is more obvious, said Dr. Lori Strachowski, chief of women's imaging at San Francisco General Hospital and an associate clinical professor at UCSF.
Ill at ease

But many men are uncomfortable talking about their breasts, even if something is clearly wrong, and that adds to the difficulty in treating and diagnosing male breast cancer, say doctors.

Men often laugh or make a joke when asked if they've ever performed a breast exam or asked their doctor about breast cancer, said Nancy Nick, founder of the John W. Nick Foundation, which raises money for male breast cancer awareness and research.

"Most of them are a little embarrassed when they come in for a mammogram," said Strachowski.

Fechtner said he wasn't embarrassed, but he could see how other men might be. He thinks doctors and other health care providers should be sensitive to the specific concerns of men who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.
Awkward in clinics

"Sitting in a mammogram center is a little uncomfortable for a man," Fechtner said. "If a man is going to be embarrassed, that could be something that prevents him from getting tested."

The treatment for breast cancer is often the same in men and women, but Fechtner said the clinics themselves were often designed with women in mind.

"I went to this fabulous Kaiser facility in Southern California and they're showing me their brand new mammogram center, and everything was pink and fluffy," he said. "When I went in for my surgery they gave out little hand-sewn pillows to put under your arm to support your breast, but it was all decorated with pink hearts or something. Maybe somebody could have made a baseball fabric."
Male breast cancer risk factors

Age: Men are more likely to get breast cancer in their 60s and 70s.

Family history: About 20 percent of men who get breast cancer have a male or female relative with breast cancer.

Genes: The same genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) that can mutate and cause breast cancer in women can also cause cancer in men.

Klinefelter syndrome: Men with this congenital condition, which causes men to have more than one X chromosome, may be more likely to develop breast cancer.

Radiation exposure: Men who have been exposed to chest radiation, usually for cancer treatment, have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

Alcohol and liver disease: Men with severe liver disease, which can be caused by heavy alcohol use, often have higher estrogen levels and may have an increased risk of breast cancer.

Estrogen treatment: Men who have received estrogen as part of treatment for prostate cancer have a slightly increased risk of developing breast cancer, although doctors say the benefits far outweigh the risks.

Obesity: Studies have shown obesity increases the risk of breast cancer in women, and is probably also a risk factor for men.

Source: American Cancer Society
Written by Erin Allday
E-mail Erin Allday at eallday@sfchronicle.com.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/12/07/MNJ91ATEK4.DTL&tsp=1#ixzz0Z0nhDJKE


No intention of copyright infringement. This content will be removed if requested.
Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko

Color of the Day : Thailand


photo : tucantravel.com

Thais people are still wearing the shirt with color which associate to their birthday as their tradition, and concerning as their lucky color for that day.
This seems like an old fashion, but you can still see and feel the tradition and culture of Thailand, the land of smiles, when you give a visit here. :)

Monday = Yellow
Tuesday = Pink
Wednesday = Green
Thursday = Orange
Friday = Blue
Saturday = Purple
Sunday = Red





FYI : If you want to find out on which day you was born, and don't wanna flip your calendar, just give a visit on http://www.dayofbirth.co.uk/.

ref : thaizer
Thank you very much.

regards,
lynnnayko

Happy Xmas (War Is Over)

On

Video By : MTVitamin

Happy Xmas (War Is Over)

So this is Xmas
And what have you done
Another year over
And a new one just begun
And so this is Xmas
I hope you have fun
The near and the dear one
The old and the young

A very Merry Xmas
And a happy New Year
Let's hope it's a good one
Without any fear

And so this is Xmas
For weak and for strong
For rich and the poor ones
The world is so wrong
And so happy Xmas
For black and for white
For yellow and red ones
Let's stop all the fight

A very Merry Xmas
And a happy New Year
Let's hope it's a good one
Without any fear

And so this is Xmas
And what have we done
Another year over
A new one just begun
And so happy Xmas
We hope you have fun
The near and the dear one
The old and the young

A very Merry Xmas
And a happy New Year
Let's hope it's a good one
Without any fear
War is over, if you want it
War is over now

lyrics : lyrics007.com

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!!!! Thank you very much.
regards,
lynnnayko